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NOTABLE BOOKS ON CHRISTIAN ZIONISM AND CHRISTIAN ZIONISTS 

Book of the Month

 

Parting Ways:  Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism

by Judith Butler

 Butler engages Jewish philosophical positions to articulate a critique of political Zionism and its practices of illegitimate state violence, nationalism, and state-sponsored racism. At the same time, she moves beyond communitarian frameworks, including Jewish ones, that fail to arrive at a radical democratic notion of political cohabitation. Amazon Review

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NEWS N BLOGS ON CHRISTIAN ZIONISM and CHRISTIAN ZIONISTS

Updated March 20, 2014

Photos:  'Christ at the Checkpoint' challenges Christian Zionism

- 972 Mag

Bachmann: American Jews 'Sold Out Israel' To Help Obama

- Rightwing Watch

Do Funders Like George Soros Pose a Threat to Evangelical Christian Support for Israel?

- Algemeiner

Harper's Christian Zionism

- The Star

The Strange Case of Canadian Zionism

- Counter Punch 

FRIENDS 

Christ at the Checkpoint

Israel-Palestine Mission Network

Steven Sizer (blog)

Porter Speakman, Jr. (blog)

Mark Braverman

Evangelicals for Middle East Understanding (new friend!)

A Texas Lutheran's Voice for Middle East Peace

Jews on First

Holy Land Christian Foundation 

Churches for Middle East Peace

Sojourners

An Open Letter to Evangelical Supporters of Israel

Christian Zionists march in Jerusalem, Octover 4, 2012. (Photo by Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org)

by Alice Su

from 972 Mag

What would Jesus do if he were standing at a checkpoint in Israel/Palestine today? Asked that question one year ago, I would have given you a blank stare. Growing up as an evangelical Christian, I thought of Israel only as a Bible-place of God’s chosen people, quaintly holy and surely blessed. Checkpoints, occupation, Palestine – these words meant nothing for most of my 22-year-old life.

Today I write from Bethlehem at the end of “Christ at the Checkpoint,” a Christian conference that asked “WWJD?” in context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and I have an answer.

The question is complicated, as is any discussion of Israel and Palestine in America. I studied the Middle East at Princeton and Oxford, where my classes were objective, historical and politically correct. I swallowed timelines and parsed narratives, but never wanted to make a value judgment on the situation. In my eyes, Tigers for Israel and the Princeton Committee on Palestine were akin to College Republicans and Democrats. Both had valid points and interesting arguments, but no one was right or wrong. Both groups also seemed very emotional, and I wasn’t one to get swept away with radical types.

Then I graduated and came to the Middle East. I first visited Israel and Palestine last August, after a summer of Arabic study in Oman and before moving to Jordan. I wanted to see things for myself but kept my eyes narrowed, wary of activists’ exaggerations.

Instead, I found an occupation; a deliberate power imbalance where the weak were daily stepped on by the strong. Israel’s being “chosen by God” somehow exempted it from international law, basic human rights and the command to love our neighbors. My church and state saw innocent people illegally hurt and beamed in approval.

This went against everything I knew about Christ’s teachings. I came expecting to find suffering but not systematic injustice, and never any Wrong in which my country, church and self were complicit. I felt shocked, confused, and used.

My friends in Jordan are always astonished to hear that I went to the best school in America, but never knew that there is ongoing oppression in Palestine. “I thought it was complicated,” I tell them.

Living here, I’ve learned that injustice is only complicated to those who don’t suffer from it. In faraway America, I’d confused myself with semantics and details on who shot what or signed which treaties when and where, and why this or that made occupation reasonable.

FULL ARTICLE FROM 972 MAG


Christian Palestinians



 
Resource for the Study of Christian Zionism and  Christian Zionists

From the Interfaith Commission of the National Council of Churches (USA)

Why We Should be Concerned about Christian Zionism


 

 

 

 

 

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Articles on Christian Zionism and Christian Zionists

sabeel.jpg (32055 bytes)

Sabeel Makes a Statement at the Christian Zionist Parade in Jerusalem


 Videos from Christ at the Checkpoint Conference in Bethlehem!


Evangelical Theology and American Politics in the Middle East

by Stephen Sizer

On September 12th, following the tragic news of the murder of Ambassador Stevens, together with members of his staff, sheltering in the US Consulate in Benghazi, a grief stricken Secretary of State, Hilary Clinton asked a simple question. A question that was on the lips of many Americans: “How could this happen in a country we helped liberate, in a city we helped save from destruction?” Andrew Bacevich, writing in Newsweek, asks,

“Why the Arab anger against the United States? Why the absence of gratitude among the very people the United States helped save, in the very countries Americans helped liberate? The way Secretary Clinton frames the question practically guarantees a self-satisfying but defective answer.”

The question, he argues, is predicated on three propositions that are regarded as sacrosanct by most US politicians and policy makers.

“First: humanity yearns for liberation, as defined in Western (meaning predominantly liberal and secular terms). Second: the United States has a providentially assigned role to nurture and promote this liberation… Third: given that American intentions are righteous and benign (most of the time) – the exercise of US power on a global scale merits respect and ought to command compliance.”[i]

I would add a fourth proposition, assumed as self evident, especially among Evangelicals, that, as God’s ‘chosen people’ the security of the State of Israel is synonymous with US interests in the Middle East and her God ordained role.

The problem is that the Arab world and Muslims, in particular, do not only not share these propositions, they repudiate them theologically. It is not that they do not aspire to political freedom from despotic rulers and oppressive governments. The Arab Spring has shown that many do indeed hunger for freedom. The problem is, observes Bacevich, “that 21st century Muslims don’t necessarily buy America’s 21st century definition of it – a definition increasingly devoid of moral content.”


Invisible Victims

by James Zogby

For decades now, Christians have been the “invisible or ignored victims” of conflicts in the Middle East. At best, the US has paid scant attention as once thriving communities of indigenous Christians in Palestine, Syria, Iraq and Egypt have been attacked, threatened, or forced to endure indignity and hardship.

FULL ARTICLE FROM AL AHRAM


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